You are here:

Boosting the Economy

Boosting the Economy

Meet The Business Owners of South Sudan

As part of International Medical Corps’ commitment to combatting gender based-violence (GBV) in South Sudan, we are working on a number of different programmes that empower women within the community.

Among other things, we offer training in business management and leadership skills that aim to prevent GBV risks whilst also empowering them within their households and their communities. Since the beginning of a UK Aid funded programme in the city of Wau in South Sudan, International Medical Corps has supported 250 women in launching small businesses through training and the provision of a start-up grants. Women are now running their own businesses and generating income through hairdressing, baking as well as selling fruits and vegetables - and these are just a few examples. Below you'll find just a handful of the many successful businesses that are allowing women to thrive in their communities. 

Rita Gabriel Adam sells roasted groundnuts as her income generating activity after receiving the start-up capital. She makes 1,500 South Sudanese Pounds a day from her business, equivalent to £63.30. 

Margaret Sarate sells groundnut paste and makes bed sheets as her incoming generating activity. She sells one set of bed sheets for 20,000 South Sudanese Pound, equivalent to just under £844. 

Regina Martin Agustino sells roasted groundnut, cooking oil, salt and dry okra as her income growing activity after she was supported by International Medical Corps with a start-up capital of 13,200 South Sudanese Pounds (£557). She now makes 5,000 South Sudanese Pounds (£211) from her successful business in a week.

Anyza Santino Martin bakes and sells bread as her income generating activity after she was supported with a start-up capital of 13,200 South Sudan Pounds (£557), making a vital difference to her families quality of life. 

Sarah Daniel Batista sells mandasi (doughnuts) and boiled eggs as her income generating activity after being supported by International Medical Corps with a start-up capital of 13,200 South Sudanese Pounds (£557). She now makes 2,850 (£120) South Sudanese Pounds a day in her successful business.

Angelina John Umido also bakes and sells bread as her income generating activity. She makes 1,600 (£68) South Sudanese Pounds a day from her business and is hoping to bring greater prosperity to her household. 

Juma Sopa, Economic Empowerment and Livelihoods Assistant, addresses the beneficiaries in Wau following the distribution of start-up capital. 

Our economic empowerment work in South Sudan work would not be possible without the generous funding of UK AID DIRECT, from the British people. 

Join the fight to help those hit by conflict and disaster around the world. Sign up to receive emails from us.

Get in touch

International Medical Corps UK will send you emails about our work and how you can contribute to that work using the data you provide. You may unsubscribe at any point. Your data will be processed in line with our privacy policy