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Democratic Republic of Congo

Somina's story

How training for police wives helps stop violence against women

Devastated by civil war

2.6 million homeless|Violence to women|Skills shortage

The people of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have endured decades of civil war - a period in which 6 million people died from violence, hunger and disease. While the war officially ended years ago, the eastern region of DRC remains one of the world’s worst humanitarian crisis zones.

Violence is pervasive, acts of rape against women and children continue to escalate and over a third of the population lacks access to basic health care.

International Medical Corps has supported over two million people since we began working in DRC in 1999. Today we provide Primary health care, Reproductive Health, Epidemiological surveillance and support for victims of gender based violence in some of the country’s most remote and volatile areas - where the presence of other international organisations is often extremely limited or non-existent.

Health Care: International Medical Corps supports 70 clinics and hospitals in North and South Kivu - providing medical supplies, training for health workers and referral services. In areas with no clinics, International Medical Corps runs mobile medical units to give vulnerable populations access to vital health care services. We also deliver health care in transit camps for refugees returning home.

International Medical Corps works in close collaboration with the Ministry of Health and non-governmental organisations to construct and rehabilitate health facilities and increase the number of well-trained health professionals in DRC - through these programmes we reached more than 145,000 people in 2015 alone.

Reproductive Health: More women than ever are dying from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth in the DRC. While the short term effects of conflict on population health are reasonably well documented, its consequences across generations and potential harms to the health of children yet to be born are often neglected.  

International Medical Corps - along with its partners the Centre for Disease Control (CDC), the University Research Co., LLC (URC) and the UNFPA - is carrying out research amongst affected populations in order to effectively improve reproductive health care services in the country.

Gender Based Violence: International Medical Corps is leading the battle against GBV by providing education and training to professionals and communities. Our behaviour change project targets those who are in a position to influence attitudes and prevent gender-based violence by adopting new attitudes towards women and girls in the DRC. 

Explore Democratic Republic of Congo

Our impact and work

Allowing the victims of rape in the DRC to be heard

Allowing the victims of rape in the DRC to be heard

Allowing the victims of rape in the DRC to be heard

Shifting opinions around sexual violence

From survivor to business woman

From survivor to business woman

From survivor to business woman

Helping vulnerable communities becomes self-reliant 

new shoes for football drc

New shoes for Innocent

New shoes for Innocent

New shoes for schoolchildren

See the difference a new pair of shoes can make for school children in the Democractic Republic of Congo

Husband and wife equal marriage

An equal marriage

An equal marriage

Changing lives

After years of violence and control from her husband, an intervention from International Medical Corps changed one woman's life forever.

training bukuva police families tile

Training police families

Training police families

Ending violence

Violence against women is a defining feature of the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which has been raging for 17 years. That’s why we’re working with  communities to stop it.

rosaline drc youth empowerment project tile

Rosaline's dreams

Rosaline's dreams

A future president?

Rosaline is an incredible example of a young person determined to succeed. She attends our Teenager Clubs enabling young people like Rosaline to act as role models to their peers.


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