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Vaccinations & Disease

Dr Conde's Story

Negotiating a ceasefire to vaccinate children against measles in Central African Republic

Our fight against Malaria, Ebola, Polio & more

disease control|Vaccination programmes|Treatment centres

Infectious diseases, such as Malaria, Cholera, respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease are the leading cause of death in children worldwide. They also claim the lives of millions of adults each year.

16 per cent of all deaths each year are caused by infectious diseases, the vast majority in low and middle income countries. Outbreaks of disease, such as Ebola in West Africa in 2014 or Cholera in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, can kill large numbers of people quickly and devastate fragile health care systems.

International Medical Corps’ primary health care, water, sanitation and hygiene projects around the world prioritise the treatment and prevention of disease. This expertise covers a wide range of activities from teaching hand washing in schools, to teach young people how to avoid water related diseases; encouraging new mothers to breastfeed for the first 6 months of their baby’s life as the best way to keep the most vulnerable children safe; to running full Ebola Treatment Centres to isolate and treat people with this most deadly and infectious of diseases.

Our vaccination programmes are designed to tackle the common diseases that have largely been eradicated in Europe and North America, but remain a constant threat to millions of children in low income countries each year. These include, polio, measles, mumps amongst others.

In Haiti, a serious outbreak of cholera claimed hundreds of lives in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. International Medical Corps took immediate action to treat and prevent the spread of disease through cholera treatment centres, oral rehydration points, water and sanitation systems, and community education campaigns.

Every year, malaria causes 655,000 deaths. Every minute, a child dies from malaria. Right now, International Medical Corps is fighting malaria around the world through treatment, prevention, and educational activities.

Since 2010, only four countries in the world still have large numbers of polio cases, down from more than 125 in 1988. The remaining countries are Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. In recent years, International Medical Corps teams have vaccinated thousands of children under five for polio in refugee settlements across Afghanistan, as well as maintaining the polio free status of countries like DRC and Chad.

When the outbreak of Ebola across West Africa reached crisis point in 2014, International Medical Corps became one of only a handful of international organisations to actually treat Ebola patients, setting up a network of Ebola Treatment centres across the region, screening hundreds of thousands of people for the diseases and treating hundreds.

Explore Vaccinations & Disease

Our impact and work

Halime's story

Halime's story

Halime's story

Fleeing as a refugee – returning as a support for others.

Charly's story

Charly's story

Charly's story

A commute like no other.

Dr Emily Bayne returns to Sierra Leone

Dr Emily Bayne returns to Sierra Leone

A year of joy and sadness

Emily speaks to Channel 5 News

Cholera immunisation South Sudan

Fighting Cholera

Fighting Cholera

An outbreak in South Sudan

A dangerous cholera outbreak in South Sudan threatened the lives of refugees living in Juba so we launched a vaccination campaign to reach more than 24,000 people.

A child screened for malnutrition in Yemen

Yemen's tragedy

Yemen's tragedy

A Yemeni aid worker shares her story

International Medical Corps Health Programme Officer Doa’a Kutbi Omer was forced to flee her home in Aden together with her husband and young baby after her neighbourhood came under attack. Read her blog

psychosocial support ebola tile sierra leone

Support for Ebola survivors

Support for Ebola survivors

Psychosocial support

Georgina shares her experiences of working with Ebola survivors to cope with the psychological consequences of the crisis.


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