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Family & Community Health

The story of Mawah

Helping villagers in Mawah, Liberia recover from the trauma of Ebola

Families and communities remain central to the well-being of all who are part of them—from the very young to the very old. 

The strength and health of these fundamental social building blocks lie at the core of achieving the United Nations-led effort to attain the Sustainable Development Goals for ending poverty and for advancing social development and better health for all by 2030.

Family and Community Health programs are crucial to meeting public health needs, especially for those living in fragile environments.

International Medical Corps works at the community level to promote health, prevent disease and assure that all family members have the opportunity to survive and thrive. Our holistic approach ensures that even those living in precarious conditions can benefit from comprehensive, quality healthcare services. At the same time, we promote healthy habits and practices that can last a lifetime and that contribute to building resilient communities.

As part of this process, International Medical Corps engages both local government and community leaders as partners to help local residents identify their own health priorities and needs, then explore the available local resources to meet them.

Fast Facts

  • Life expectancy grew in most regions of the world from 2000 to 2016, with an overall global rise of 5.5 years.
  • Cases of wild poliovirus have decreased by more than 99% over the past three decades, from an estimated 350,000 cases reported globally in 1988 to 33 in 2018.
  • Every two minutes a child dies from malaria.

 

 

 

Areas of Focus

Community Health

International Medical Corps works with both residents and their leaders within the communities we serve to promote and support programs and other efforts that improve access to basic health services.

We train community health workers and volunteers to provide health education to adults and adolescents on a variety of topics designed to improve disease awareness, such as recognising and preventing malaria, diarrhoea and dehydration; providing access to basic healthcare, including visits to the local health centre for a routine checkup (especially for women during pregnancy); and taking children to vaccination sites for immunisation.

Actively seeking out and involving community residents is key to implementing effective community-level programs, which is why International Medical Corps pursues this approach at every stage of the program cycle. We believe community ownership and stewardship are crucial ingredients for sustainable programs that ultimately contribute to better health outcomes for all.

Key Stats

  • If left untreated, an individual infected with tuberculosis can spread the disease to 10 to 15 people every year, though not all will become sick.
  • Among the 73 countries that collectively account for 96% of maternal deaths globally, only four have the potential midwifery workforce needed to deliver essential maternal, newborn and reproductive healthcare.
  • The World Health Organization estimates that 4.6 million people die each year from causes directly attributable to air pollution.

Disease Control

International Medical Corps works to help vulnerable communities worldwide prevent and respond to communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, as well as non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and mental disorders.

Over 1 billion people each year are affected by infectious diseases—including neglected tropical illnesses which thrive in impoverished and marginalised communities, in conflict zones and the overcrowded conditions that so often prevail in settlements for refugees and the internally displaced. In such places, poor sanitation, limited access to safe drinking water and often-inadequate health services combine to make conditions ideal for disease outbreaks.

In Africa, infectious diseases remain a leading cause of illness and death but elsewhere, it is non-communicable disease that has become the main causes of illness and death, quietly thriving with none of the drama of attention-getting epidemics and emergency vaccination campaigns.

A significant number of International Medical Corps’ responses have included technical assistance for the treatment and control of epidemic diseases. Our staff of around 7,000 worldwide includes physicians and public health specialists who coordinate health responses worldwide and engage in pandemic preparedness activities.

At International Medical Corps, are goals are to:

  • Improve epidemiological surveillance, prevention and response to epidemic-prone diseases.
  • Contribute to health security and protection of vulnerable populations.
  • Contribute to the global target of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030.
  • Educate and inform populations on disease control measures.
  • Work with community partners to end practices that contribute to the spread of disease.

Explore family & community health

Our impact and work

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Born into Exile

Born into Exile

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Caring for Refugees and Migrants in Libya

Caring for Refugees and Migrants in Libya

Caring for Refugees and Migrants in Libya

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The Road to Recovery Begins

The Road to Recovery Begins

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Fatima's Story

A Desire to Serve

A Desire to Serve

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A desire to serve

“I want to help the people of my community however I can”

“I want to help the people of my community however I can”

“I want to help the people of my community however I can”

Jean's Story

“I wish to help others in my community so that we can help ease suffering in Bria, whatever it takes”

“I wish to help others in my community so that we can help ease suffering in Bria, whatever it takes”

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Ballot Junior's Story

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